It's Finally Here!!!!

We now have 20 different "Podiatric Educational Videos" for your viewing pleasure!

At the left of this page, click on "Educational Videos" which will bring you to a page of 20 different topics about your feet. Please feel free to view as many as you would like.

In addition to our new video collection, our team of specialists and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well-being. For your personal use, we have an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. You can browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics that interest you. Finally, for a more comprehensive search of topics, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

Adult-acquired flatfoot or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction usually leads to a gradual loss of the arch. The posterior tibial muscle is a deep muscle in the back of the calf and has a long tendon that extends from above the ankle and attaches into several sites around the arch of the foot. The muscle acts like a stirrup on the inside of the foot to help support the arch. The posterior tibial muscle stabilizes the arch and creates a rigid platform for walking and running. If the posterior tibial tendon becomes damaged or tears, the arch loses its stability and as a result, collapses, causing a flatfoot.

Surgery is often performed to give the patient a more functional and stable foot. Several procedures may be required to correct a flatfoot deformity, depending on the severity of the problem. These may include:

  • Tenosynovectomy—a procedure to clean away (debridement) and remove any of the inflamed tissue around the tendon.
  • Osteotomy—removal of a portion of the heel bone (calcaneus) to move the foot structure back into alignment.
  • Tendon Transfer—in which replacement fibers from another tendon are inserted to help repair damage.
  • Lateral Column Lengthening—A procedure that implants a small piece of bone, usually removed from the hip, outside of the heel bone to create the proper bone alignment and rebuild the arch.
  • Arthrodesis—Fusing of one or more bones together to eliminate any joint movement, which stabilizes the foot and prevents any further deterioration or damage.

Contact Us

Michael K. Block, DPM

410-569-0445
3401 Boxhill Corporate Drive Suite 201 Abingdon, MD 21009